don't give up your rights without a fight.
choose marcus wilkerson

attorney

Facts about aggravated assault

On Behalf of | Jan 21, 2022 | Criminal Defense |

In Texas, assault charges usually some with serious penalties, and when the charge becomes aggravated assault, the penalties tend to be even more severe. When is an assault considered aggravated under state law?

Aggravated assault

An assault becomes aggravated when it involves certain factors, such as using a deadly weapon, causing serious bodily injury or assaulting someone who is elderly or disabled. For example, if you hit someone and they suffer a broken bone as a result, your assault charge would likely become aggravated. Other factors that can elevate an assault charge include the use of a deadly weapon or the intent to cause serious harm. Additionally, assaults that occur during the commission of other crimes can be classified as aggravated assaults.

What are the penalties for aggravated assault?

As a second-degree felony, aggravated assault is punishable by between 2 and 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. However, if the victim suffers serious bodily injury from this type of violent crime, you could get charged with a first-degree felony, which is punishable by between 5 and 99 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

In many cases, people charged with aggravated assault can face additional penalties on top of jail time and fines. For example, you may have to attend anger management classes or counseling. You may also be subject to a restraining order that prohibits you from coming near the victim. Additionally, if you’re convicted of aggravated assault, the authorities may deny you the right to possess a firearm.

Getting charged with aggravated assault can have serious consequences. If you’re convicted, you could end up in prison, so it’s important to look at your options for defense.